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5 March 2014

5th March 1944: Wimbledon homes & Clock House bombed

5 Sun. Raw, cold, dull, calm; the snow soon melted. Monica who is ten just called, also Ann who is five this week. To Wimbledon Common. Saw where two unexploded bombs lay. The Clock House on the Common is destroyed. Three fine large houses on Putney Hill down. West Hill is closed. Two large houses where Inner Park Road joins Wimbledon Park Side are destroyed. Heard there are six unexploded bombs at Chessington. On fire duty tonight. There is quite a nice little rose on the climber at the front door; it came out a fortnight ago; rather pale but very precious.

Note: see this link for brief history of the Clock House, an 1888 building bombed in 1944 - see page 4 of the Wimbledon Society newsletter.

2 comments:

  1. I have been enjoying Fred's diary, and it has inspired me to begin posting journal/diary entries written by an uncle while serving with the USAAF's 42nd Bombardment Group, 13th Air Force in the South Pacific. The blog is www.waynes-journal.com and entries are posted on the day he wrote them -- 70 years later. The entry for March 7, 1944 was written while he was on Guadalcanal. He wrote "The boys said this island looked like any normal U.S. city at night. Lights everywhere. The ships in the harbor lighted as if they were Christmas trees."

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  2. Thanks for that comment and link. I happen to live near a Devon, UK, village which was the site of a US NAVAL airfield during WWII - we live in a very rural area within the circuit - it's now a small General Aviation field with parachuting, flying school and small industrial units. A family supported by some local people and servicemen's descendants in the US have had a small museum here and provide info at https://www.facebook.com/pages/Dunkeswell-Memorial-Museum/187975841246663 - Dunkeswell Memorial Museum. You may be interested.

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